Washington State: Haven for Special Interests

It is my impression that Washington, more than perhaps any other state, is led by special interests. My impression is based in part at least on my law practice which focuses on real estate and business, so my awareness of this influence is pretty much confined to those areas.Let me give you a few examples of what has given me the impression that special interests are more influential here than most other places.
Perhaps my most shocking moment practicing law occurred when, during oral argument before the State Supreme Court, a representative of the insurance industry pointed to the justices and told them that his people were closely looking at how each one of them voted on this case and the insurance industry would be heard from come election time. (I am paraphrasing here but this message was loud and clear.) I thought that this was a truly shocking insult to the integrity of the court, but the justices said nothing.
In the area of construction law Washington is I believe the most repressive with respect to consumer rights. Did you know that if a building or bridge collapses six years after it is permitted, there is absolutely no recourse against anyone in the construction industry, including builders, suppliers, architects, engineers, even surveyors and anyone one else claiming to be in the industry? Condominium owners have no recourse if their building collapses four years after it was permitted (although this is a little murky). In Washington, at least with respect to being able to enforce warranties and representations, all the talk about the useful life of structures is bogus. After six years (four for condos) no one is responsible.This is the result of Washington’s statute of repose, which is jokingly said to have received that name named because people had to be asleep for the legislature to get the law through.
Other states have statutes of repose. These were pushed through state legislatures by an unprecedented lobbying effort on the part of the insurance and building industries in the 1960’s. Washington’s four year statute for condos and six years for absolutely everything else is extremely rare among the states and may be the shortest of any state. If you buy a new condo you should know that you are stuck if anything (however disastrous) goes wrong four years after the permit was granted, which is ofter about two or so years after it is filled.
To give you a sense of the influence of the building lobby, in Washington say a school building collapses six years after completion and kills a child whose watch stops for no good reason. There would be no recourse against anyone in the construction industry but the parents could sue the watch manufacturer for the cost of the watch. Personal property here has a twelve year (or the useful life of the product) statute of repose.
Perhaps the best indicator of the exalted state of special interests here is that when three sitting justices of our State Supreme Court announced last week that they were seeking reelection, the newspaper interviewed not a law professor or someone who practices before the court, but a representative of B.I.A.W., the building industry lobby.
Washington State: Haven for Special Interests

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